Google Lunar X prize: India’s moonshot at the space race

Indian startup Team Indus is one of just 16 remaining teams racing to the moon for a $20m prize

Sometime in late 2017, a tiny vehicle will blast into space from India on a 10-day journey to the moon.

As it finally lands on the lunar surface some 238,900 miles later, its fate will rest entirely on four small aluminium parts in its shock absorbers. They need to work in a vacuum, with lubrication that doesn’t freeze or jam no matter what the angle. And if they fail, there’s no one to go up and fix it – meaning that eight years of work and $20m (£13.2m) in prize money will be lost in space.

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HTC’s Preview program looks to give users a sneak peek into the company’s future

HTC unveiled its Preview program, which hopes to equip a select number of users with software and hardware to test out and provide feedback for. The program is currently accepting sign-ups, though there’s no guarantee you’ll be selected.

The post HTC’s Preview program looks to give users a sneak peek into the company’s future appeared first on Digital Trends.

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Israel tests new Barak 8 missile to defend offshore gas rigs

Weapon system being developed jointly with India as Israel fears Hezbollah has acquired Russian-made missiles that can be fired from land at targets on sea

Israel’s military says it has successfully tested an advanced surface-to-air missile that analysts believe could play a key role in securing the country’s offshore gas fields.

Related: Russian TV stations broadcast secret nuclear torpedo plans

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Totally Wired: where is music tech going next? – Tech Weekly podcast

How can we make sure artists get a fair deal in the age of streaming? Can electronic music ever be truly live? Tech Weekly goes under the bonnet of the latest tech developments in music with Imogen Heap and Tim Exile

From the gramophone to the iPhone, music has always had a symbiotic relationship with technology. But with the proliferation of streaming services and the collapse of sales, the digital era has increasingly disenfranchised those making the music itself. Now with the rise of musician-developed apps and software, artists can take back the reins creatively but what about economically?

We talk to musician Imogen Heap about her visions for “fair-trade music” enabled via blockchain technology; electronic artist Tim Exile talks us through his latest software, Flesh, which injects an element of chance into electronic music performance and Peter Doggett give us a whistlestop tour of some of the biggest tech innovations that transformed music over the last 100 years.

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