Corsair gets insane with the RGB illumination on its three new ‘Lux’ keyboards

Corsair has introduced three new “Lux” versions of its K70, K70 RGB, and K65 RGB mechanical keyboards, two of which sport an insane illumination system. The two K70 units are full-sized while the K65 model comes without the numeric keypad.

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UK data privacy regulator to monitor WhatsApp’s data sharing with Facebook

Regulator will track how the messaging service shares data with its parent company after the announcement of a controversial new policy

The UK’s data privacy regulator said on Friday it would monitor how popular messaging service WhatsApp shares data with parent Facebook under a new privacy policy.

The Information Commission’s Office (ICO) said while some users may be concerned by the lack of control provided by the updated privacy policy, others may consider it a positive.

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Oculus cooking up a VR containment system for room-scale Rift experiences

The Oculus Rift Touch controller arrives soon, and Oculus VR is getting customers ready by building what’s known as a caged system. It’s similar to HTC’s “Chaperone” method for the Vive headset, which defines a block of physical space for injury-free movement.

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Stingray documents offer rare insight into police and FBI surveillance

Unsealed court records in Oakland reveal cases where a warrant wasn’t required to listen to calls and how much law enforcement uses the devices

Court documents unsealed by a judge in Oakland, California, have revealed rare insights into how local police and the FBI use a sophisticated surveillance device known as Stingray.

Stingray, manufactured by the Delaware-based Harris Corporation, is one of a class of devices known as “cell site simulators” or “IMSI-catchers”. Around the size of a suitcase, they work by pretending to be a cellphone tower in order to strip metadata and in some cases phone content and data from nearby devices tricked into connecting to it.

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