UK government plans new legislation to tame internet’s ‘wild west’

New laws will make Britain ‘safest place in the world’ to be online, culture secretary says

New laws will be introduced to tackle the internet’s “wild west” that will make Britain the “safest place in the world” to be online, the culture secretary has said.

Social media companies have already taken some positive steps to protect users, but the performance of the industry overall has been mixed, according to Matt Hancock.

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Tech firms can’t keep our data forever: we need a Digital Expiry Date

Requiring companies to erase our information quarterly would offer us greater freedom online – without destroying profit margins

It’s taken a long time, but people have finally discovered how much information companies like Google and Facebook have on them. We cannot keep sacrificing our privacy and dignity to continue using the internet. However, at the same time, new digital innovations that millions love and enjoy require our data. So what are we to do?

The biggest issue with the software industry’s data collection is the span of time for which it hoards information. The industry simply does not believe in a delete button. For instance, Google has records of all my locations for the last six years, and Facebook has my deleted messages from nearly 10 years ago.

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NHS warns patients they could lose text alerts as GDPR deluge continues

Health service joins UK firms in rushing to comply with new data protection rules

The National Health Service is texting patients to warn they could lose alerts about hospital and doctor appointments, joining the deluge of more than 1bn “GDPR” messages currently hitting personal inboxes to meet an EU deadline this week.

GDPR, which stands for General Data Protection Regulation, has been described as the biggest overhaul of online privacy since the birth of the internet, and comes into force on Friday May 25. It gives all EU citizens the right to know what data is stored on them and to have it deleted, plus protect them from privacy and data breaches. If companies fail to comply, they can be hit with fines of up to €20m (£17.5m) or 4% of global turnover.

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